baram

I create in a wide range of disciplines and materials. My work establishes the relationship between disrupted landscapes and displacement. An index of the trek1 of pilgrim, refugee, pioneer, and the exiled. Challenging the man-made borders of geography and culture.

My work extends my practice of African philosophy. A belief that ancestors got reunified and digested back into the earth. Leaving behind their imprints of rituals, ceremonies, trauma, and survival. The crust of the earth has become a bruised epidermis retaining tragedy and prosperity. A mute witness of the course of humanity. In my work, I excavate the testimonies of interrupted lives out of landscapes. This process in return offers a means to rebuild collective memory. To develop new modes of organizing experience. Giving reinterpretations to our transactions with nature and our translations of cultural inheritance.

My two and three-dimensional ensembles2 are mixing archaic materials and found objects with alternative process photographs. I am using rust, wood, molder fabrics, and earth to reference my interest in the ritual. A reminder of ancestors moving across the uncharted sea, steppe, ice, desert, and forest. The surface of my ensembles is weathering manipulation of photographs and reclaimed fabrics resembling the texture of the crust of the earth.


1. trekked, trek·king, treks (i) To make a slow or arduous journey. (ii) To journey on foot, especially to hike through mountainous areas.(iii) South African, To travel by ox wagon.
2. Ensembles. Starting as mixed media collages that can grow into three-dimensional work. Combining disciplines – sculpture, painting, photography and installation.

baram